Paper Pieced Flying Geese for Christmas Table Runner

Paper Pieced Flying Geese for Christmas Table Runner

                                                     PAPER PIECED FLYING GEESE

I prefer the paper pieced method when making Flying Geese.  I’ve tried other ways, and they are usually crooked.   I find this method to be very accurate.   

This tutorial is written for the Christmas Table Runner pattern on my website.  The technique is for one goose at a time.

To begin click on Quiltmaker.com.

Scroll to the second page, where is says Flying Geese 1 ½” x 3” finished size.  You will need to print 3 copies of page 2. PAGE 2!!   We will be using the rectangle patterns on the left of the page.  Three pages will give us 9 rectangles. We need 8.  One can be used for practice!  Check the scale at the bottom left of the page before printing.  If you don’t print to the 2” scale, your geese won’t fit.

Cut around each of the 9 rectangles so you can work with small pieces of paper instead of that big 8x11 paper. DO NOT CUT ON ANY LINES!

FG templates 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You will need a glue stick.  I use fabric glue.  You only need a tiny bit.  Turn your paper over, print side down.  On the back side of the paper, rub a dot of glue in the middle of the triangle with the number 1 in the center.

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Take one of the WHITE 2 (4.25” x 2.5”)  pieces, place it on the back of the paper, centering it  over the triangle with the number 1 in the middle, right side of fabric facing up (wrong side against the paper). 

Here’s the thing: most white fabric doesn’t really have a right or wrong side so you’re not gonna mess up here.  But remember this step for the geese in your future.   

Hold your project up to a bright light or window, fabric facing you.  Make sure your fabric covers the 3 lines that make up triangle 1 by AT LEAST ¼”.

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Next, grab one of your diagonal cuts from Fabric B and place it as shown here.  

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On the back of the paper, you have right sides together.  Use the bright light or window to ensure that the diagonal fabric is centered from left to right, and covers the seam line between  1 & 2 by at LEAST ¼”, but not too much more.  Also make sure the bottom seam allowance is covered - the line just above my thumb.

You can place a pin to hold that piece still, or use the glue, or just hold it in place.  Flip the paper over.   Set your stitch length to 1.5.  This makes removing the paper much easier, less tearing of those precious stitches.

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Stitching on the paper, fabric underneath it, stitch along the printed line between 1 & 2.  Start outside the seam allowance, and end beyond the seam allowance. 

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Fold the paper back on itself, away from the fabric. 

 

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Now cut the excess white fabric down to ¼” away from the stitched seam you just made.

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Press the fabric open (paper on the bottom).

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 Place the matching diagonal piece as shown below, right sides together, paper down.

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Hold it up to the light.  Center it from left to right, and be sure the piece covers the seam line between 1 & 3, and the bottom seam allowance is also covered.

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Stitch along the printed line between 1 & 3.  Start outside the seam allowance, and end beyond the seam allowance.

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Fold the paper back on itself, away from the fabric, and cut the excess white fabric down to ¼” away from the stitched seam you just made.

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Press the fabric open.  Almost done!!

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Turn it over and trim the unit along the seam allowance lines – the outermost lines – on all 4 sides. Be careful here!  Don't cut the seam lines.

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It will look like this after trimming.

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Gently, pull the paper away from the seam lines.  Folding the paper first helps. 

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And there you have it!  A perfectly pieced Flying Goose. Make the other 7 (or 8 if you used one to practice) the same way.

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This may seem like a whole lot of work, but I’m tellin’ ya, once you get the hang of it, you fly through these (no pun intended) and it doesn’t take any longer than any other method I tried.

This same website has templates for piecing adjacent geese – same steps with one or two modifications, but perfect, perfect points.  That’s another tutorial….or email me.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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