Tularosa & Cimarron

Tularosa & Cimarron

I’ve taken to naming my quilts after towns in New Mexico.  The names of other people’s quilts always sound so clever. It’s a hard thing to do – naming a quilt. So I decided to just google ‘towns in New Mexico’, and pick one that fits. I received this top in 2012 as part of a barter for longarm services.  The woman had numerous unfinished tops to choose from, and I chose this one.   It’s been hanging in my closet(s), first in Texas, then came with me to NM.  It’s not really my type of quilt. I probably thought I’d practice on it…and never did.  I decided to cut it up and play around with the blocks, and ended up with this: So, this was better.  But no magic going on. I then chose to cut arcs and make a version of a double wedding ring. The pattern is by Sewing Party, called My Wedding Ring.     Progress…. Add a little color in there: Now I’m loving it.  Onto the longarm: And the big reveal~a very different quilt to be sure. TULAROSA   Cimarron is based on a Kaffe Fassett pattern called Haze Kilim. I went a little rogue on the border, but not much.  I used Patina Batiks by Hoffman – I love them.   I think there are 11 different shades in here. Adding the sashing in between blocks. CIMARRON It’ll be for sale, as soon as I end my procrastination that is called…’List your things in your Etsy store’. I miss this baby…. Thanks for checking in!...
At the End of the Day

At the End of the Day

Apologies for this dull, hard to read, grey text.  I seem to have lost the ability to change font color.  This was a stab at an art quilt.  My friend Carole Harston painted this a few years ago, and I’ve always drooled over it. Transitions, by Carole Harston 40″ x 30″  My fabric choices.  Love this part.  I added a few others along the way, but only a few. Most of these were used only once or twice in each panel. I decided to break my work into 3 panels, each one 12″ x 27″.  I had a color copy made, and then covered the sections of the photo I was NOT working on. I pieced small wedges of fabric together. I did not used any backing as I sewed (no muslin, no batting). Second panel (above) So these were the 3 panels, untrimmed.  Next step….the longarm. Then I finally got to trim them.  It’s really hard to resist trimming up to this point. Finally, I stood back to see the almost end result. I tried to tell myself that I was imagining the issues with the left panel.  I slept on it, even looked at it from afar: Couldn’t take it. SO! It went in for major surgery: (at which point I learned that I STILL should not have trimmed the panels yet) Now, I am NOT very skilled at art quilts to begin with.  To say I knew how this was going to be put back together would be very generous. But I did know that I could just make the entire panel again if I had to.  (not my first choice) In the above photo, you can see the newly created section. It looked like it was gonna be much better on the eyes. Now to sew it together. First, I picked out 3 rows of longarm quilting from the top and bottom sections.  Next, I cut a piece of batting to fit in there, and fused it to the edges of the original batting, using fusible batting tape. (photo below) This is when I realized I had no plan to sew a new piece of backing on.  It gets a little sketchy here. I cut a piece of backing fabric that was the exact height, plus 1/2″.  I pressed the top and bottom 1/4″. I applied this double sided tape I have (Atemto Double Sided tape .1 inch) to the folded edges. This tape isn’t for sewing, I’m sure. I really didn’t care at this point. I had made peace with the fact that the back was not going to be perfect. I flipped the blue fabric and finger pressed it onto the existing backing fabric. Next, I took the panel to my regular machine and quilted it with straight lines as I had done on my longarm.  This (above) is after I trimmed it.  You can see the flaw.  I totally chose to pretend it was not there, and carried on. I applied facing to the panels instead of binding.   SOOOO much better!  I am so glad I dove in to the reconstruction.  I’ve named it ‘At the End of the Day’.  And here’s why. Aside from the fact that it DOES LOOK like the end of the day, I get so annoyed by any new and unnecessary verbage, or lingo, or slang, that pops up into our language. When my kids were young, and started saying “like” 3 times in every sentence, I...
Chama

Chama

I do love quilting other peoples’ quilts, but I welcome the current break in demand. It offers me time to create some of the things going on in my head. Also, more sitting. A couple years ago, I purchased a pattern by Whirligig Designs called ‘Taos’ (coincidence….). I chose not to buy the recommended rulers, reasoning that all one needs is a straight ruler and a calculator and one can get the job done.  Well, that’s a load of crap and I deeply regretted not buying the rulers.  But I did ‘get the job done’, nonetheless. I’ll post the progression photos here. I think it’s interesting to see it grow.  Here are some shots after it went through the longarm. I’ll start with the good ones. So that’s all well and good. But then there was this disaster: You can see Wheeler Peak in the middle. And in the points connecting the white squares.  This was more than a little crushing.   With some skill, I could turn the peak into a valley.  Sad face. I did some research, queried about it on Instagram, and I now believe the source was too many straight lines meeting in one point.  I was told that blocking would help.  So I blocked it: So much work. I rarely block quilts, and never this big. I’m not recommending that you skip this step. I’m just saying I’m pretty lazy.  I don’t have any carpet anywhere. I had to wash this floor, wash the quilt, square it with my handy 90 degree laser tool, weigh it down with whatever I could find in the garage, and wait 2 days for it to dry.  It really, really did help tremendously.  A non-quilter would not notice. I called it a win. So now I’ll enter it in a show or two (or try to), and then sell it. (or try to) Ruby takes dress-up every seriously. Thanks for checking...
Catherine’s Memory Quilt

Catherine’s Memory Quilt

I finished this about a month ago, just now getting around to sharing it.   A very recently widowed gentleman brought his wife’s clothes to me for a memory quilt.  He was very sure of the type of quilt he wished to have- wonky…funky…asymmetrical…lots of curves.  The clothes were mostly double knits, sweatshirts, rayon, and a little bit of quilting-type cotton. Catherine loved the beach. Therefore, lots of ‘movement’ was called for in the finished piece.  It was something I enjoyed, I took very seriously, and I was in frequent contact with Ronald to make sure I was not straying from what he envisioned.  It was a great partnership. Here’s what evolved, to the pleasure of us both. Thanks for looking! Debbie...
The Halloween Quilt

The Halloween Quilt

This is a 102″ square quilt that a customer brought into the shop, asking “Can you do this by Saturday?”  And I did! The shapes are traditional, so I just thought ‘that won’t take long’.  When will I learn? It’s so cute, I had to take out my bigass stand to take pictures. So many different fabrics were used, and they each lent themselves to different quilting designs, so I just dug in and had fun.  I free hand stitched a lot of new things and it was definitely enjoyable.  I didn’t photograph every block, but almost….   I wish I had outlined this hat in black. And lastly, the back.  Oftern undervalued.   Thanks for looking!...